Good News from St. Pius V: Our Summer Newsletter is Now Available!

Keep up with the latest from our parish and school with the Summer 2016 issue of our quarterly newsletter Good News from St. Pius V.

You will read about how we are supporting youth in our neighborhood and parish, the latest from our school, the winners of the annual car raffle, a profile of one of our newest parish members and more!

Back issues of the newsletter are available by clicking here. For our weekly Sunday bulletin El Mensajero click here.

Why St. Pius V School?

Are you happy with your child’s school? With a long history of educating generations of families, St. Pius V School provides academic excellence with faith, values, and a commitment to peacemaking.

We are located in the heart of the Pilsen community – close to UIC, the Medical District, and downtown Chicago – though our students come from neighborhoods throughout Chicago and even the suburbs!

St. Pius V School serves students from Early Education (full-day pre-K) through 8th grade and offers a wide array of before and after school programs.

Our students thrive in a nurturing environment while being challenged daily by our rigorous academic programming. They learn values that complement their family’s faith formation and help them become peacemakers in their community. A diverse learning atmosphere and faith-focused teaching ensure St. Pius V students have the ability to learn without distractions.

And our graduates go on to the best high schools in the Chicago area!

Come visit us!

Call (312) 226-1590 to schedule a tour and see for yourself the great things that are happening at St. Pius V School!

For more information please see our school’s Facebook page.

The NFL and Domestic Violence

Most people have seen and been shocked by the video of NFL star player, Ray Rice, punching and dragging his fiancé out of an elevator. Others have remarked that they are not surprised; this is what domestic violence looks like. What did you expect?

While Ray Rice has been suspended, other players who have abused their wives or children are not receiving proper disciplinary action for their abuse. One example is Adrian Peterson who was restored to active playing despite having beaten his son. Public outrage is building. Commercial sponsors are withdrawing their support or threatening to do so. These are healthy signs that we as a people do not tolerate abuse in the home.

Although we can find a report in the news every week about domestic violence, it remains a rather unseen and underestimated crime. It happens behind closed doors and in secret and victims are extremely reticent to come forward.

But the facts belie this blindness. The FBI estimates that every 10 to 15 seconds a woman is battered or sexually assaulted in the U.S. The Center for Disease Control reports that one out of every four women is either hit or sexually assaulted by her partner during her life time.

That’s incredible: one out of four.

We might think that domestic violence happens elsewhere but not in our community. But all studies confirm that the incidence of domestic violence is practically the same in all communities; it makes no difference if you are Black or Hispanic, Caucasian or Asian, rich or poor, whether you live in the suburbs or city. Domestic violence exists at practically the same rate in every community
But how do we Catholics respond to this heinous crime and grave sin? Our U.S. bishops have written a beautiful pastoral letter, titled, When I Call for Help. Sadly, it is a well-kept secret.

In the first paragraph they write: “We must state as strongly and clearly as we can that violence against women, inside or outside the home, is never justified.” And then in the final paragraph they state: “We must emphasize that no one is expected to stay in an abusive marriage.”

Unfortunately, most priests have not been prepared to deal with domestic violence. They see it as too controversial or difficult to preach about. They may even think it is inappropriate to talk about in church or that it rarely happens because victims have not approached them. In reality, if they don’t speak about it, victims will be reluctant to come to them. Some priests even tell victims they must return to their abusers and work it out. They tell victims they must accept their cross.

In fact, few dioceses have any services for victims of domestic violence. In St. Pius V and the Archdiocese of Chicago, we are fortunate to have services for victims and their children and even for perpetrators. St. Pius V also offers courses in parenting to help parents raise their children in a healthy environment.

Domestic violence has risen to a new level of awareness and outrage, thanks to abuse by some NFL players. May our Catholic Church authorities also recognize their failure to adequately respond to victims and perpetrators and begin to provide the necessary services to demonstrate the compassion of Jesus to those who suffer so terribly in their own homes.

St. Pius V School needs you on September 25

Parents should be given the ability to choose the education best suited to their child’s needs and desires. As their child’s primary educators, parents know what is best for them and what type of school – public, charter, private, sectarian – best meets their needs.

We hope you will join us on Thursday, September 25, 2014, to rally in support of school choice. There are two ways you can stand with us:

  • Come to St. Pius V School play lot to join our children for our local mini-rally.
  • Slip out of the office for an hour and join others at The State of Illinois Building (The Thompson Center) at Randolph and Clark.

Both events begin at 10:30 am.

To learn more about the many avenues Illinois could pursue to empower parents and improve education visit the Office of Catholic School’s website.